Children and Mobile Technology

Course Content

Course Overview

Children and young people are among the most avid users of mobile technologies but these new technologies also come with new dangers. Parents, governments and industry have a role to play in protecting and supporting children who are connected.

This course looks at the issues from several angles and examines whether regulation is necessary.

Course Objectives

• Learn what is known about children’s use of mobile technologies.
• Acknowledge the benefits while mitigating risks for children.
• Understand the law related to online child sexual exploitation.
• Understand the role of regulation in child online protection.

Course Completion Certificates

All of our courses are certified by the UK Telecoms Academy (UKTA) and can be used as evidence of professional development.

To qualify for a course completion certificate, students need to view all the course sessions and complete a short final project. Students are also strongly encouraged to take part in weekly live chat sessions and to discuss the course content on the Course Forum.

Children & Mobile Session 1

Session 1: Children and Mobile Technology

Children & Mobile Session 2

Session 2: mLearning

 

Children & Mobile Session 3

Session 3: Safe and Responsible Use of ICT

Children & Mobile Session 4

Session 4: Roles and Responsibilities

Children & Mobile Session 5

Session 5: Online Child Sexual Exploitation

Course Forum

This forum is restricted to members of the associated course(s).

This forum is restricted to members of the associated course(s).

This forum is restricted to members of the associated course(s).

This forum is restricted to members of the associated course(s).

This forum is restricted to members of the associated course(s).

Resources

GSMA has carried out a number of comparative studies in the past years. Its latest study explores children's use of mobile phones in Algeria, Egypt, Iraq, and Saudi Arabia. More research studies are available here.

Conventions & legislation

United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child (UN CRC)
The UN CRC is the cornerstone of children’s rights. The Convention has three optional protocols: the Optional Protocol on the involvement of children in armed conflict, the Optional Protocol on the sale of children, child prostitution and child pornography, and the Optional Protocol on a communications procedure. Visit the Indicators webpage to see a list of countries which have ratified the Convention and its Optional Protocols.

Council of Europe Convention on Cybercrime (Budapest Convention)
The Council of Europe convention includes child pornography under Title 3 – Content-related offences. State parties are represented by the Cybercrime Convention Committee (T-CY). Another convention by the Council of Europe is the Convention on the Protection of Children against Sexual Exploitation and Sexual Abuse (Lanzarote Convention). Most member states of the Council of Europe have ratified this Convention.

At national level, many countries have frameworks which tackle aspects related to child online protection and child sexual abuse. The International Centre for Missing & Exploited Children (ICMEC) regularly carries out global reviews of national legislation. More information about ICMEC’s review and model legislation is available on ICMEC’s website.


Guidelines

Among the main guidelines for stakeholders are the International Telecommunications Union’s (ITU) guidelines forChildren; Parents, Guardians and Educators; Industry (updated); and Policy-makers. The guidelines form part of the ITU’s Child Online Protection (COP) initiative, and were produced in collaboration with several partners and experts.


Research & studies

Several studies have been carried out on children’s and young person’s use of technology and the Internet. On a global level, UNICEF's Innocenti Research Centre, established in 1988, carries out and supports research on children's rights. View the centre's research projects and publications, The centre's work over the past 25 years is documented in an anniversary publication.

In the European Union, one of the most widely known research initiatives is the EU Kids Online, a multinational research network funded by the EC’s Better Internet for Kids programme. The network’s latest findings are available on its website.

In the USA, regular studies on children and technology are carried out by the Pew Research Centre (see the 2015 study on teens, social media and technology).

Other resources

Child Safety: A User-Centred Approach to Internet Governance
DiploFoundation’s comic book (second edition) presents an illustrated short story of a child who feels distressed as he accesses a harassing video online, and the reactions and roles of his parents, civil society, and other stakeholders.

Discussion paper series

Children’s Rights and Business in a Digital World. Privacy, protection of personal information and reputation rights UNICEF’s website.

Course Duration
3 weeks
Next Scheduled
Coming soon
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Course Leader
Lauren Dawes
Email Leader

Lauren is the Senior Manager for the Internationals Relations team, engaging with institutions such as the International Telecommunications Union (ITU), the World Bank, and the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) on industry-related policy issues. Prior to this role, she was the Senior Partnerships Manager for the Capacity Building programme and formerly led the GSMA Mobile Learning, Mobile for Youth Employment programmes within Mobile for Development (M4D). During her time with M4D, Lauren led a programme of activities targeted at providing mobile learning content to youth in developing countries, including authoring a landscaping report on mobile learning for youth in developing countries. Lauren has taught on topics of Mobile for Development, Children and Mobile Technology, Digital Security, and Digital Communications.

Course Moderator
Husniye Ilhan
PARTNER & DELIVERY COORDINATOR
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